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Posts tagged "Surgical Errors"

High rate of preventable errors in hospitals

Hospital patients in Arizona may be surprised to learn that preventable medical errors are the third highest cause of death in the U.S. according to the "Journal of Patient Safety." Examining several recent studies, the article found that between 200,000 and 400,000 people die each year as a result of these errors.

Hospital faces hefty fines in near-fatal surgical error

Arizona residents undergoing medical procedures may be alarmed to learn how careless some surgeons or surgical staff can be, especially when they accidentally leave a piece of surgical equipment inside a patient. In fact, a California hospital has been fined approximately $86,000 for such carelessness.

Safer surgery practices

Arizona patients facing the possibility of surgery may worry about issues such as pain, recovery time and safety as they prepare for their procedures. While safety issues have been addressed consistently over time, there is still room for further optimizing safety practices in the operating room. An error has the potential to create long-term problems or even result in the death of a patient, which makes it important for all involved in surgical activity to be striving for better results. An Oxford University study has analyzed certain safety systems to identify which provide the best outcomes.

Safety culture important in reducing surgical errors

Hospitals in Arizona and around the country might avoid mistakes by focusing just as much on non-technical safety as on surgeons' skills. According to a study originally presented at the American Medical Research Symposium in 2014 and published in the "Journal of American College of Surgeons," skills such as teamwork and communication are important in creating an overall safety culture within a hospital that reduces the likelihood of errors.

Occurrence rates of drug errors during surgeries

Surgery can range from short diagnostic procedures to lengthy spinal fusions in Arizona hospitals, and even the simplest of these procedures involve risks. One of the most surprising risks may be that of medication errors. A recent study was conducted in a Boston hospital known for being a leader in patient safety. The study covered drug errors in surgeries held over a seven-month period during 2013 and 2014, and the results were surprising given the hospital's reputation.

Reducing orthopedic surgical error claims in Arizona

A study was recently completed by The Doctors Company, and researchers from the medical malpractice insurer found that a number of claims for orthopedic surgery medical malpractice concerned improper patient management. To help reduce the number of claims for these issues, guidelines were drawn up, and they focus on ensuring that patients are aware of potential complications and that medical professionals stay alert for problems.

A surgical site infection can cause serious injury

When a person in Arizona is preparing to have a surgical procedure, it can be a harrowing time. Whether it is a small or large issue that must be dealt with, there is an inherent trust placed in the medical professionals performing the surgery. Even if it goes as planned, there is still a chance for complications to occur. One such issue can be a surgical site infection.

New skills for modern-day surgeons

Residents in Arizona might be interested in learning more about the new non-technical skills that surgeons have been advised to adopt. The new handbook authored by researchers associated with the University of Aberdeen underscores the importance of situational awareness, communication in the operating room and effective decision making. According to the authors, these non-technical skills may be critical for savings patients' lives. Poor teamwork, mental errors and other non-technical factors often contribute to the alarming rate of adverse effects realized at U.S. medical facilities.

Surgeon fatigue and medical errors in Arizona

According to a recent study headed by a doctor at the University of Toronto, surgeon fatigue may not lead to increased errors during elective surgeries. If a patient had an elective surgery on a day where the surgeon had previously performed a procedure between 12 a.m. and 7 a.m., there was a 22.2 percent chance of an error. There was a 22.4 percent of an error if the surgeon had sufficient sleep the night before.

Legislation may pave way for malpractice evidence

Arizona residents who will be undergoing surgical procedures may soon gain the ability to use video recordings as evidence in subsequent treatment error proceedings. If the state follows in the footsteps of others, like Wisconsin and New York, patients could be given the right to request that their surgeries be recorded in advance. Analysts say that the videos might both serve as study materials for medical practitioners seeking to reduce the incidence of errors as well as an indication of malpractice.

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Law Offices of Raymond J. Slomski, P.C.

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